lizayzay:

“Here’s my application for the University of Texas. I’d appreciate your thoughts on it. Also, I’m going to be running for student council president, here’s my petition with all the signatures. One more thing. Don’t tell me I can’t get into college ever again. If I don’t get in, then you can call me an idiot. But I don’t want to hear that from you ever again. See, I don’t accept that fate for myself, and I’m gonna do everything in my power to avoid it.”-Tyra Collette

lizayzay:

“Here’s my application for the University of Texas. I’d appreciate your thoughts on it. Also, I’m going to be running for student council president, here’s my petition with all the signatures. One more thing. Don’t tell me I can’t get into college ever again. If I don’t get in, then you can call me an idiot. But I don’t want to hear that from you ever again. See, I don’t accept that fate for myself, and I’m gonna do everything in my power to avoid it.”-Tyra Collette

I want to mourn the deaths of Mike Brown and Eric Garner and Trayvon Martin, and I want to question why the deaths of Renisha McBride and Islan Nettles and Kathryn Johnston haven’t gotten similar traction. Why the beating of Marlene Pinnock isn’t on all of our lips. Why the nation is not familiar with the names of Stephanie Maldonado, or of Ersula Ore. And how many women’s names do we not know because they don’t dare come forward? Because the violence they experience at the hands of the police is sexual, and the shame and stigma around sexual violence silences them?

Why don’t we hear about women victims of state violence?

on the role of misogyny, transmisogyny, and respectability politics in which state violence against people of color makes news.

(via disabilityhistory)

Minaj’s perspective has always been multi-dimensional; she comes forward as an immigrant, as a black women, as a female rapper, as a sexual being, as an artist, as a storyteller, as a survivor, as a bad bitch. She comes forward in order to tell her own story, be it one of domination or declaration. Minaj has even come forward as a feminist. She’s actually done it over and over again. And yet, instead of simply embracing her own discourse on the topic, feminists often can’t wrap their heads around it.

Carmen via Nicki Minaj’s Feminism Isn’t About Your Comfort Zone: On “Anaconda” and Respectability Politics | Autostraddle (via autostraddle)