slugzone:

we can recognize that police brutality is bad in like dystopian novels like the hunger games for example people recognize that the peacekeepers are an oppressive force but when its happening in real life to real people its always “not all cops are bad” because they only target people our society doesnt view as fully human like people of color, trans people, disabled people, poor people, and sex workers

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

Ferguson’s constitutional crisis: First Amendment violations are only part of the story. (via dendroica)

BREAKING: Egypt urges US restraint in Ferguson

mood-indie-go:

lovevlife:

pattilahell:

lifesentences:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Egypt’s government has called on US authorities to show restraint against protesters in Ferguson, Missouri.

It said it was “closely following the escalation of protests” after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman on 9 August.

The statement echoes US President Barack Obama’s comments during Egypt’s crackdown on protesters in 2013.

Correspondents say the criticism is unusual since Egypt gets about $1.5bn (£1bn) in aid from the US every year.

President Obama is under increasing pressure to bring an end to the violent scenes in the St Louis suburb.

It is now 10 days since Michael Brown’s death, which sparked mass demonstrations.

Jay Nixon, the governor of Missouri, has ordered the National Guard to support police operations, but violence flared again on Monday night, with law enforcement officers arresting 31 people.

Police officers point their weapons at demonstrators protesting against the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri - 18 August 2014The unrest continued on Monday night, with police firing tear gas at crowds of demonstrators

The statement from Egypt’s foreign ministry followed a similar call from United Nations chief Ban Ki-moon, who called on Missouri police to abide by “US and international standards”.

Iran added its voice to the criticism, with Majid Takht-Ravanchi, the deputy foreign minister for European and American Affairs, saying the unrest was a sign of “the phenomenon of racism” in the West.

Meanwhile Chinese state news agency Xinhua said that despite the US playing the role of an international human rights defender, the clashes showed “there is still much room for improvement at home”.

"Obviously, what the United States needs to do is to concentrate on solving its own problems rather than always pointing fingers at others," the Xinhua editorial added.

Can we just get into the bold real quick… 

All these reads

ooop. 

The bolded

image

I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged.

: I am not Mike Brown. (via fullbodiedlovin)